After you die

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Death in service

If you die during​ Reckonable Service, and you haven’t already taken any of your benefits, the following benefits will be paid - part from the RMPP and part from the RMSPS:

  • A lump sum: This is four times your​ pensionable pay plus the actual value of your Cash Balance fund (i.e. not reduced to for early payment).  If you leave a spouse, civil partner, child or other dependant, a further two times your pensionable pay is payable.
  • Dependants’ pensions: These are for a spouse or civil partner - or, if you’re not married or in a civil partnership, someone who was financially dependent on you. The pension is half of the pension you built up before 1 April 2018 (including revaluation since then).. Pensions can also be paid to your children, usually until they turn 18.

It’s very important that you confirm who you would like to get any benefits when you die. There are different forms for you to fill in - these are to be found at the bottom of this page.

If you’re already taking some of your benefits when you die, a lower amount may be payable.


Death in deferment

A Deferred member is someone who isn’t paying in to the RMPP anymore, isn’t building up future benefits and isn’t yet taking any of their pension; sometimes known as a ‘Preserved member’. If you die as a Deferred member, the following benefits will be paid - part from the RMPP and part from the RMSPS.

If you are still employed by your Employer (that is, you have opted out of the Plan)

A lump sum. This will be the actual value of your Cash Balance fund (i.e. not reduced to for early payment) plus the higher of:

  • Four times your final pensionable pay at the date you became a Deferred member; 
    OR
  • Five times the annual rate of the Age60 and Age65 pension (excluding any pension supplement and without enhancement) assuming you were entitled to the immediate payment of this pension at the date of your death.

Note: For the purposes of this calculation, final pensionable pay is not reduced by the Lower Earnings Deduction.

A pension. This will be paid to your spouse or civil partner, and will be half the Age60 and Age65 benefits that you would have received at the time of your death. There may be children’s pensions payable as well, usually until they turn 18.

If you are not married or in a civil partnership, a pension may be payable to someone who is financially dependent on you (such as a partner you live with).

If you have left your Employer

Lump sum
Five times the annual rate of the Age60 and Age65 pension (excluding any pension supplement and without enhancement) at the date of your death plus the actual value of your Cash Balance fund (i.e. not reduced to for early payment).

Note:

  • The lump sum death benefit from the above calculation is capped at a maximum of four times your final pensionable pay plus the actual value of your Cash Balance fund (i.e. not reduced to for early payment).
  • The final pensionable pay for this purpose is not reduced by the Lower Earnings Deduction.
  • If you were part-time, the final pensionable pay will not be uprated to the full-time equivalent.

A pension. This will be paid to your spouse or civil partner, and will be half the Age60 and​
Age65 benefits that you would have received at the time of your death. There may be children’s pensions payable as well, usually until they turn 18.

If you are not married or in a civil partnership, a pension may be payable to someone who is financially dependent on you (such as a partner you live with).

Whether you are still employed by your Employer or not, it is very important that you tell us who you would like to get any benefits when you die. There are different forms for you to fill in - these are to be found at the bottom of this page.

If you’re already taking some of your benefits when you die, different amounts will be paid.


Death in retirement

If you die after you’ve started taking all your benefits, your spouse or civil partner will get a pension. If you’re not married or in a civil partnership, you can nominate someone who is financially dependent on you to receive the pension. And if you die within five years of starting to take your benefits, a lump sum is paid too.

It’s very important that you confirm who you would like to get any benefits when you die. There are different forms for you to fill in - these are to be found at the bottom of this page.

If you’ve not had your Age60 and Age65 benefits both put into payment when you die, different amounts will be paid.


Financial support for the people closest to you

You can nominate somebody to receive some benefits from the RMPP (and from the RMSPS) when you die. They could be eligible for a lump sum and/or a pension, depending on whether you die in service, after you have left work (but not taken your pension), or in retirement.

If you need to tell us about the death of a member, please contact the​ Pensions Service Centre.